Book Description

From School Library Journal Grade 1-5?Each of these eight fables is presented in a two-part format. The first part consists of a wordy introduction in which Aesop explains the meaning and possible context of the tale and relates it to his own life as a freed Athenian slave. Several of the selections, such as The Frogs That Wanted a King and The Jay and the Peacocks, are not often anthologized. Each telling contains descriptions of the setting, extensive dialogue, and rounded-out motivation. Unfortunately, the resulting long-windedness violates the pithiness of the genre. The Lion and the Mouse comes in at over eight pages. The preface makes clear what advice the ensuing selection will impart; the final paragraph of the narrative emphasizes the upcoming lesson, and a neatly framed moral is appended. This triple treatment leaves nothing to chance or children's ability to interpret meaning. However, Johnson's richly toned paintings in a pleasing variety of shapes grace the pages with lively animal and human activity. Three times as many fables in a quarter of the words appear in Ver?nica Uribe's Little Book of Fables (Groundwood, 2004), while Helen Ward's grand retelling of a dozen tales in Unwitting Wisdom (Chronicle, 2004) features more subtly designed illustrations that embellish the stories' content.?Susan Hepler, Burgundy Farm Country Day School, Alexandria, VA Copyright ? Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. Read more Review ?A host of anthologies gather favorites old and new...A dramatic image of the lion caught in the net as the mouse attempts to free him is especially effective. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information. ? ?Publishers Weekly?Colorful, whimsical illustrations depict people and animals in Ancient Greece as gracious and joyful. An engaging introduction to these timeless tales.? ?Children's Literature Read more See all Editorial Reviews

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