Book Description

From Publishers Weekly This charming memoir of childhood is a bestseller in Ireland, where Taylor tends the market and post office of Innishannon. She brings to life the simple delights of growing up on a farm in a large family ruled by a loving mother and a father who had 'a high level of intelligence and a low threshold of tolerance.' The children were reared in an environment structured according to the cycles of nature, enjoyed relative freedom and observed the facts of life unfolding daily before them. A delightful evocation of Irishness and of the author's deep-rooted love of 'the very fields of home,' this picture of bucolic life in an earlier time, with its rituals of religion and the antics of local characters, has universal appeal. Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. Read more From Library Journal This is an Irishwoman's book of memories from a child's-eye view, told with all the immediacy and freshness of a child's vision. Taylor lovingly portrays a self-sufficient farm life that no longer exists. It included her family, a host of unique neighbors, and all of their doings through turns of the season: going to school and the strand, haying, dealing with animals, and coping with the death of her brother. This book is reassuring and enlivening to the human spirit. An unexpected best seller in Ireland, it should do as well here as any James Herriot title.- Janice Dunham, John Jay Coll. Lib., CUNYCopyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. Read more See all Editorial Reviews

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