Book Description

Review 'I wish we'd all been given a copy of this in first year of university. Even now I can find gems of information about Chinese characters in this book that I didn't know before. It's a nice book to have around.' ?Hugh Grigg, East Asia Student blog'?learning how to write Chinese characters will provide a more thorough understanding of their structure and compositin, as well as open the door to the world of Chinese caligraphy. William McNaughton's Reading and Writing Chinese is an excellent introduction to this knowledge.' ?Qiu Gui Su, About.com Mandarin Language'?this book can be the best choice for Chinese beginners who want to learn Chinese characters. With exact pronunciation, lively definition and derivation, it will make the process of characters learning more interesting and easier.' ?Yes?Chinese.com'Excellent reference book for beginning and Intermediate-level Chinese. Well laid out with several ways to look up characters. Common phrases are also listed with each character.' ?GoodreadsI really love how this book puts an emphasize on mnemonics, bringing this Chinese character learning method to the mainstream. It's really nice seeing more books embracing this method. The bottom line: this book effectively combines the mnemonics of Heisig and Remember the Hanzi with the practicality of HSK and character frequency studies. It makes a great reference book for any student. ?En Route to Fluency blog'My mom is from Okinawa and we lived on Okinawa several times. I even took Japanese at a local community college, but none of my textbooks were ever as good as 600 Basic Japanese Verbs! From the very beginning, in the introduction, the verbs are broken down into easy to understand categories: u?dropping conjugation, ru?dropping conjugation, and irregular conjugation. Never has anyone taken the time to explain this to me before and now I am finally starting to understand Japanese when I watch anime with my kids, watch J-drama, or listen to my mom speaking Japanese.' ?Goodreads Read more About the Author Jiageng Fan specializes in the linguistic relationship between the Chinese and Japanese languages and scripts, focusing on the etymology of characters. He has lived, studied and taught Chinese, Japanese and/or English in China and Australia and has traveled extensively. After obtaining a B.A. at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, then working as a magazine editor, he moved to Christchurch, New Zealand, where he earned a First Class Honours Degree from the University of Canterbury.William McNaughton was the founding teacher of Chinese at Oberlin College. From 1986 he taught at Hong Kong's City University, where he was the founding program leader of the BA (Honours) program in Translation and Interpretation. Read more

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